Tag Archives: CFOI

Workplace Violence Rate Against Government Employees Three Times Greater than Private Sector Workers

The average annual rate of workplace violence perpetrated against local, county, state, and federal government employees in 2011 was three times greater than that of private sector workers, according to the report ‘Workplace Violence Against Government Employees, 1994–2011 (NCJ 241349)’ released by the U.S. Justice Department’s Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS). The April 2013 report, part of the ‘Violence in Workplace Series,’ is available at http://www.bjs.gov/content/pub/pdf/wvage9411.pdf. Continue reading

Workplace Violence Accounts for Nearly One in Every Five Fatal Work Injuries in US

Preliminary statistics from the 2011 Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries (CFOI) program conducted by the U.S. Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) reveal that nearly one in every five fatal work injuries was attributed not to accidents but to workplace violence. The CFOI found that of the 4,609 total fatal work injuries recorded in the United States in 2011, 780 fatalities – or nearly 17 percent – were a result of violence and other injuries by persons or animals. For more information about the 2011 Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries (CFOI), visit: http://stats.bls.gov/iif/oshcfoi1.htm#2011. Continue reading

2011 Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries Preliminary Data Reveals Most Dangerous Jobs in America

According to the preliminary results of the 2011 Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries (CFOI) program conducted by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the number of fatal work injuries in the United States in 2011 was 4,609, down slightly from the final total of 4,690 in 2010. The CFOI program also revealed that the most dangerous job in America belonged to fishermen based on their highest rate of fatality, although truckers suffered the most total deaths of any occupation. For more information about the 2011 Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries (CFOI) program, visit: http://www.bls.gov/news.release/pdf/cfoi.pdf. Continue reading

Revised 2010 Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries Shows One Out of Ten Workplace Deaths Attributed to Homicide

According to the revised numbers reflecting updates to the 2010 Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries (CFOI) conducted by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), the final count of fatal work injuries in the United States in 2010 was 4,690, up from the preliminary count of 4,547, with 518 of those deaths, up from  506, caused by workplace homicides. These figures mean approximately 11 percent of workplace deaths – more than one out of ten – were attributed to homicide. The revised 2010 CFOI of April 2012 for the preliminary results in August 2011 is available at: http://www.bls.gov/iif/oshwc/cfoi/cfoi_revised10.pdf. Continue reading

OSHA Issues Enforcement Procedures for Investigating or Inspecting Workplace Violence Incidents

Recognizing workplace violence as a serious occupational hazard that has ranked among the top causes of death in workplaces in recent years, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) recently issued a directive on ‘Enforcement Procedures for Investigating or Inspecting Incidents of Workplace Violence’ that establishes general policy guidance and procedures for OSHA field offices to apply when conducting inspections in response to incidents of workplace violence. The OSHA directive is available at http://www.osha.gov/OshDoc/Directive_pdf/CPL_02-01-052.pdf. Continue reading

US Bureau of Labor Statistics Reports More than 4,500 Fatal Work Injuries Recorded in 2010

According to recently released preliminary results of the National Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries (CFOI) program conducted by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), a total of 4,547 fatal work injuries were recorded in the United States in 2010, a figure nearly identical to the final count of 4,551 fatal work injuries recorded in 2009. The CFOI program also reported that the rates of fatal work injury for U.S. workers in 2010 and 2009 were the same: 3.5 per 100,000 full-time equivalent (FTE) workers. Continue reading