Tag Archives: CORI

NAPBS Issues Comments on Proposed Changes to Massachusetts Criminal Offender Record Information

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Written By ESR News Blog Editor Thomas Ahearn

The National Association of Professional Background Screeners (NAPBS®) has submitted comments to the Massachusetts Department of Criminal Justice Information Services (DCJIS) in response to the revised version of the proposed changes to DCJIS regulations governing the Criminal Offender Record Information (CORI) that reiterates previous comments NAPBS filed with the DCJIS in May of 2016. Continue reading

Massachusetts CORI Reform Law Effective May 4 2012

The Massachusetts Department of Criminal Justice Information Services (DCJIS) has launched a new Criminal Offender Record Information (CORI) request service online called ‘iCORI’ that will allow individuals and organizations to request and obtain Massachusetts criminal offender record information over the Internet. For more information about iCORI, one of the main provisions of the new CORI Reform law that took effect on May 4, 2012, visit the DCJIS web page at: http://www.mass.gov/eopss/agencies/dcjis/. Continue reading

Massachusetts Criminal Offender Record Information CORI Reform Law Provisions Take Effect May 4

On May 4, 2012, many of the new provisions of the Criminal Offender Record Information (CORI) Reform Law, Chapter 256 of the Acts of 2010 signed by Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick in August of 2010 will take effect. Commonly known as ‘CORI Reform,’ the law changes who will have authorized access to CORI and how CORI will be accessed.  As a result of the CORI Reform, the Massachusetts Department of Criminal Justice Information Services (DCJIS) will replace the existing CORI system with a new secure, web-based system called ‘iCORI’ that should be available on May 7, 2012. Continue reading

ESR NEWS ALERT: Massachusetts CORI Reform Law Prohibits Employers from Asking About Criminal Convictions on Initial Job Applications Effective November 4, 2010

By Thomas Ahearn, ESR News Blog

Starting November 4, 2010, employers in Massachusetts will no longer be able to ask about convictions on “initial” job applications because of new legislation that prohibits employers from asking questions on initial written job applications about criminal offender record information, which includes criminal charges, arrests, and incarceration.

As previously reported on the ESR News Blog, the new law overhauls the Commonwealth’s Criminal Offender Record Information (CORI) law and contains several provisions that will affect the way employers use the criminal histories of prospective and current employees and impact Massachusetts employers performing criminal background checks on job applicants and employees.

While the new law does not prevent employers from obtaining criminal histories of job applicants or employees contained in the CORI database, under the CORI reform law those records will no longer contain:

  • Felony convictions closed for more than ten years, whether convictions occurred more than ten years ago or individuals were released more than ten years ago.
  • Misdemeanor convictions closed for more than five years.

In addition, the new law also includes the following provisions:

  • Employers that decide not to hire applicants or take adverse actions based on criminal histories in CORI reports must first give applicants copies of the reports.
  • Employers conducting five (5) or more criminal background checks per year must maintain a written criminal offender record information policy.
  • Employers are prohibited from maintaining CORI records of former employees or unsuccessful job applicants for more than seven years from the last date of employment or from the date of the decision not to hire the job applicant.

After the initial application of the CORI reform law provision which restricts questions by employers about criminal history on initial written job applications takes effect on November 4, 2010, employers that continue to ask questions on initial written applications about felony or misdemeanor convictions after that date may be subject to liability under the new law, experts warn.

For more information, visit Employment Screening Resources (ESR) at http://www.ESRcheck.com.

Employment Screening Resources (ESR) is the company that wrote the book on background checks with ‘The Safe Hiring Manual’ by ESR founder and President Lester Rosen. ESR is recognized as Background Screening Credentialing Council (BSCC) Accredited by the National Association of Professional Background Screeners (NAPBS®) for proving compliance with the Background Screening Agency Accreditation Program (BSAAP). For more information about Employment Screening Resources, visit http://www.ESRcheck.com.