Tag Archives: SHRM

Use of Credit Reports and Criminal Records for Employment Screening comes under Scrutiny

By Thomas Ahearn, Employment Screening Resources (ESR) News Editor

An article in the February 2011 issue of the Society for Human Resource Management’s (SHRM) HR Magazine‘Close Up On Screening’ – describes how employers are scrambling to adjust to changes in the myriad of state and federal laws that govern pre-employment background screening due to increased scrutiny by legislators and policy enforcers on the use of credit reports and criminal records in hiring decisions.

For examples, Illinois recently became the fourth state — after Hawaii, Oregon, and Washington — to restrict the use of credit histories in hiring decisions, while Massachusetts became the second state, in addition to Hawaii, to prohibit private employers from asking about criminal records of job applicants on initial written job applications.

However, contrary to public opinion, a 2010 survey from SHRM – ‘Conducting Credit Background Checks’ – showed credit histories were used sparingly and wisely in hiring decisions.

“The perception that employers are ordering massive amounts of credit reports is nothing like the truth,” said Lester Rosen, President of San Francisco-area background check provider Employment Screening Resources (ESR), who was quoted in the HR Magazine article.

According to the SHRM survey on credit background checks, when respondents were asked if their organization or an agency hired by their organization conducted credit background checks for any job candidates by reviewing their credit reports:

  • 47 percent responded they performed credit background checks on selected job candidates.
  • 40 percent responded they did not perform credit background checks on any job candidates.
  • 13 percent responded they performed credit background checks on all job candidates.

Regarding which categories of job candidates that organizations conducted credit background checks on, the SHRM survey revealed that 91 percent of “job candidates for positions with fiduciary and financial responsibility” underwent credit background checks.

As for restrictions on criminal records, the SHRM article indicates at least two dozen cities and counties and five states have narrowed questions on their job applications to cover only felony convictions or have stopped asking about criminal history entirely and have “banned the box,” a reference to removing the boxes on applications that job applicants must check if they have even been convicted of a crime. 

“With ‘ban the box’, applicants can be considered without pre-judging,” said Rosen, the author of ‘The Safe Hiring Manual – The Complete Guide to Keeping Criminals, Terrorists, and Imposters Out of Your Workplace,’ a comprehensive guide to background checks. “From a government point of view, it makes sense to get people back to work and to avoid the extra costs of social services. Private employers prefer to ask upfront.”

Furthermore, while employers conduct criminal background checks to guarantee safety in the workplace and to avoid negligent hiring lawsuits, they may attract attention from the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) if they are not careful in doing so. The article noted that while procedural consistency is important throughout an organization, criteria consistency is important within job groups.

“Not all janitors are background screened the way you screen accountants, but janitors should be screened consistently with janitors,” Rosen explained in the article. “Employers get in trouble when they engage in automated decision-making. There always should be a human review to make sure you’re making the right decision.”

Rosen added that while many employers know the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) contains procedures for conducting credit background checks, some are unaware the FCRA also covers criminal background checks and offers specific “adverse action” procedures an employer must follow if a background check results in a denial of employment for a job applicant.

As a result, many employers are turning to an outsourced background screening and safe hiring partner to establish protocols and consistent practices while also helping to eliminate inappropriate use of screening results.

“A good background-screening partner makes sure the employer is in compliance with the act and other laws, abides by adverse action rules, conducts consistent checks within job groups, and follows EEOC guidelines for using criminal reports,” Rosen said.

To learn more about background checks, visit the Employment Screening Resources (ESR) website at http://www.ESRcheck.com and read more about ‘credit reports’ and ‘criminal records’ on the ESR News Blog

Founded in 1996 in the San Francisco area, Employment Screening Resources (ESR) wrote the book on background checks with ‘The Safe Hiring Manual’ by ESR founder and President Lester Rosen and is accredited by The National Association of Professional Background Screeners (NAPBS®) . To learn more about Employment Screening Resources, visit http://www.ESRcheck.com or contact Jared Callahan, ESR Director of Client Relations, at 415.898.0044 or jcallahan@ESRcheck.com.

Sources:
http://www.shrm.org/Publications/hrmagazine/EditorialContent/2011/0211/Pages/0211roberts.aspx
http://www.shrm.org/Research/SurveyFindings/Articles/Pages/BackgroundChecking.aspx

Bill Limiting Credit Checks of Job Applicants for Employment Screening Reintroduced in Congress

A bill that would limit the use of credit checks of job applicants in employment screening has been reintroduced into Congress by U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen (D-TN).

As originally written, the ‘Equal Employment for All Act’ would amend the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) to prohibit the use of consumer credit checks against prospective employees and existing employees as a means of making adverse employment decisions, with an exception for employers seeking applicants in national security or positions with major financial responsibilities.

Congressman Cohen – who wrote the same bill in the last Congress but it was never voted on – noted in a news report that the recession has led some job applicants into debt and credit checks can keep them unemployed. He also noted the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) has suggested such use of credit checks may affect women and minorities disproportionately.

A 2010 survey from the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) on the use of credit reports for employment screening revealed that:

  • 13 percent of employers surveyed conducted credit checks on all job candidates.
  • 40 percent of employers did not conduct any credit checks on job candidates.
  • 47 percent of employers considered credit checks for candidates of selected jobs.
  • 60 percent of employers overall ran credit checks on at least some applicants.

Credit checks for employment purposes have become a very controversial subject. Job applicants looking for work in a tough economy are caught in a classic “Catch-22” situation where they have bad credit because they cannot get a job but cannot get a job because they have bad credit.

Employment Screening Resources (ESR), a leading provider of background checks accredited by the National Association of Professional Background Screeners (NAPBS), believes credit checks are just one of many factors – including education, experience, references, and past criminal history – that employers use to find qualified job applicants, employers should approach with caution when using them for employment screening, and articulate a clear rationale as to why a credit check is related to a particular job. Employers should also be aware of the potential for errors in credit reports.

The question of whether use of credit checks in employment screening is discriminatory is so controversial that the use of credit reports for employment screening is the number one background screening trend for 2011 as chosen by Employment Screening Resources founder and President Lester Rosen. For a list of all trends in ESR’s ‘Top Ten Trends in Employment Screening’ for 2011, visit: http://www.esrcheck.com/Top-Ten-Trends-In-Background-Screening-2011.php.

For more information about credit background checks, visit Employment Screening Resources (ESR) at http://www.ESRcheck.com.

Founded in 1996 in the San Francisco area, Employment Screening Resources (ESR) wrote the book on background checks with ‘The Safe Hiring Manual’ by ESR founder and President Lester Rosen and is accredited by The National Association of Professional Background Screeners (NAPBS®) . To learn more about Employment Screening Resources, visit http://www.ESRcheck.com or contact Jared Callahan, ESR Director of Client Relations, at 415.898.0044 or jcallahan@ESRcheck.com.

Sources:
http://www.govtrack.us/congress/bill.xpd?bill=h111-3149
http://www.commercialappeal.com/news/2011/jan/20/credit-check-bill-is-refiled/

Background Check Industry Has Changed Much in Years from 2000 to 2010

By Thomas Ahearn, ESR News Editor

With the end of the year 2010 now upon us, the time seems right to look back at how much the background check industry has changed since the year 2000. In slightly over a decade, background checks have gone from a luxury to a necessity, from a primarily  government run endeavor to a substantial private sector business with a large number of firms providing service, and from a mostly expensive time and labor consuming task to, in some cases, a totally automated paperless solution.

Due in large part to the shocking terrorist attacks that unfolded on September 11, 2001 and led to increased security on all fronts in the United States, the background check industry has increasingly helped employers keep criminals, terrorists, and imposters out of their workplaces. Other factors behind the increased use of background checks include well publicized incidents of workplace violence, multi-million dollar negligent hiring verdicts, a sharp rise in cases of resume fraud including some well publicized examples of fake degrees, and a national awareness of the dangers to children and other vulnerable groups when unqualified or dangerous persons are allowed access to them.

Below are comparisons of background checks in 2000 and 2010 in six critical areas that have changed in the industry:

1. Number of employers performing background checks:

2. Industry standards for background checks:

Many changes have occurred with respect to background screening industry standards in the years between 2000 and 2010.

  • 2000: There is no national trade association, industry standards, or definitive publications on background screening. Steve Brownstein, Publisher of the Background Investigator, holds the first ever background check industry conferences in Long Beach, California and then larger events in Tampa, Florida. Employment Screening Resources (ESR) founder and President Lester Rosen is the keynote speaker at these first industry conferences.
  • 2003: As a result of the Tampa conferences, momentum builds for a professional trade association for the background screening industry. ESR President Lester Rosen serves as the chairperson of the steering committee that founded the National Association of Professional Background Screeners (NAPBS®), a non-profit trade association representing the interests of background check companies, and serves as the first co-chair. NAPBS seeks to “…promote ethical business practices, promote compliance with the Fair Credit Reporting Act and foster awareness of issues related to consumer protection and privacy rights within the background screening industry. The Association provides relevant programs and training aimed at empowering members to better serve clients and to maintain standards of excellence in the background screening industry.”
  • 2004: ‘The Safe Hiring Manual – The Complete Guide to Keeping Criminals, Terrorists, and Imposters Out of Your Workplace’ by ESR President Lester Rosen is published, the first comprehensive book on employment screening.
  • 2010: NAPBS launches the Background Screening Agency Accreditation Program (BSAAP) for a singular background check industry standard representing a background check company’s commitment to excellence, accountability, and professionalism. The Background Screening Credentialing Council (BSCC) is the governing accreditation body that ensures background check organizations seeking accreditation meet or exceed a measurable standard of competence. To become accredited, a background check company must pass a rigorous audit of its policies and procedures as they relate to six critical areas of the BSAAP: Consumer Protection, Legal Compliance, Client Education, Product Standards, Service Standards, and General Business Practices.

3. Sources for background check information:

  • 2000: Background check information is mostly limited to traditional sources such as criminal records, driving records, verifications, and reference checks.
  • 2010: With the advent of new technology like the Internet in general – and new media such as blogs, videos on YouTube, and social networking sites like Facebook in particular – there are many more potential outlets from which employers may gather information about job applicants.

4. The need for international background checks:

  • 2000: Before the rise of outsourcing, much of the workforce is perceived to have lived, worked, and been educated inside of the United States, so the idea of international background checks for job applicants seems expensive and unnecessary to most companies. There are also limited resources available for such background checks.
  • 2010: According to recent U.S. government statistics, there are 38.5 million foreign-born U.S. residents representing 12.5 percent of the population, more than 1.1 million persons became Legal Permanent Residents (LPRs) of the United States in 2009, and the unauthorized immigrant population living in the U.S. reached an estimated 10.8 million in January 2009 and grew 27 percent between 2000 and 2009. Given these facts, U.S. companies must be prepared to perform international background checks on job applicants with global backgrounds. Numerous resources are now available for background screening firms to conduct international background checks, as well as resources concerning international privacy and data protection.

5. Compliance issues concerning background checks:

  • 2000: Background check companies must comply with the federal Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA), originally passed in 1970, that regulates the collection, dissemination, and use of consumer information and is enforced by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC).
  • 2010: Background screening has become an intensely legally regulated endeavor. Background check companies must comply with a myriad of industry regulations in addition to FCRA requirements such as the Fair And Accurate Credit Transaction Act (FACT Act) of 2003 (which amended the FCRA), Sarbanes-Oxley, the Patriot Act, E-Verify employment eligibility verification, Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) discrimination issues against protected classes pertaining to the use of criminal records and credit reports for employment purposes, and new consumer data privacy protections regulations such as “Safe Harbor” and privacy laws that protect the Personally Identifiable Information (PII) of consumers. Another source of intense legal regulations are state laws regulating credit reports and criminal records. California, for example, completely revamped its background screening laws in 2002 and added new requirements in 2010 when PII is sent offshore beyond the protection of U.S. privacy laws. Many states have their own version of the FCRA. 

6. Technology used in background screening:

  • 2000: Most employers are required to fax orders to a background check firm. The idea of entering orders into an online system or making information available online is only in the beginning stages.
  • 2010: Technology in the background check industry has increased substantially, with the use of online processes to not only enter orders but to have paperless systems with electronic signatures and integration into Applicant Tracking Systems (ATS) so background checks can be ordered with the click of a mouse. With the advent of Web 2.0, employers may expect to see more advances in the technology for the background screening process. The downside, however, is that Internet entrepreneurs have seized upon background checks as a way to make quick money and in some instances are playing off the fears of Americans by offering cheap and instant checks that are based upon databases never intended to be a substitute for a background check. 

Much has changed in the background check industry in the years spanning 2000 to 2010.  Employment Screening Resources (ESR) – founded in 1996 in the San Francisco area – has kept pace with advancements in the many changes regarding background screening. ESR is recognized as:

  • An accredited background screening firm by the NAPBS,
  • The company that wrote the book on background checks with ‘The Safe Hiring Manual’ by founder Lester Rosen,
  • The third U.S. background check firm to be ‘Safe Harbor’ Certified for data privacy protection, and
  • One of the first background check firms to introduce an online system to place orders, view status of orders, and retrieve reports.   

To learn more about Employment Screening Resources in 2011, visit the ESR web site at http://www.ESRcheck.com or contact Jared Callahan, ESR Director of Client Relations, at 415.898.0044 or jcallahan@ESRcheck.com.

Happy New Year from Employment Screening Resources!

Background Check Expert Lester Rosen Comments on Evolving Background Check Industry in HR Magazine Article

By Thomas Ahearn, Employment Screening Resources (ESR) News Editor

According to background check expert Lester Rosen, while the background check industry is still fragmented, he notes in an article about pre-employment background checks in HR Magazine that some consolidation has occurred and that he expects consolidation in the industry to continue with two background check firm models evolving: large data-driven industries and smaller boutique-style firms emphasizing education and consultation.

Rosen – founder of Employment Screening Resources (ESR) and author of ‘The Safe Hiring Manual – The Complete Guide to Keeping Criminals, Terrorists, and Imposters Out of Your Workplace’ – was quoted in an article “Backgrounds to the Foreground” in the December 2010 issue of HR magazine, a publication from the Society for Human Resources Management (SHRM), saying two background check models have evolved.

“Investment banking firms buying and consolidating big companies is a new trend. Larger financial interests are involved at the same time we still have medium-size or boutique firms,” Rosen, an Attorney at Law, says in the story, adding that two models for background check firms have evolved: “A large data-driven industry with assembly-line-like practices and a boutique approach with emphasis on education and consultation.”

The author of the article, Bill Roberts, a contributing editor for HR Magazine, writes that the stakes have never been higher when it comes to choosing a background check firm to protect a business and its reputation due to legal challenges and security concerns. While juries still punish employers for inadequate background checks – one jury mentioned in the article awarded over $20 million in a negligent hiring case – the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) has increased enforcement against overuse of background checks that the agency claims violate federal law.

To help employers choose a background check partner, the article notes that the National Association of Professional Background Screeners (NAPBS) launched an accreditation program in March 2010 to apply best practices for consumer protection, legal compliance, and client education, and standards for court researchers, data, and verification, to its members. The NAPBS accredited companies were announced before year-end of 2010.

The article also reveals that while some vendors have ISO certification from the International Organization for Standardization, the ISO only designates that formal business processes are applied and that the ISO is not specific to background checks and does not guarantee quality of products or services like the NAPBS accreditation.

The HR Magazine article “Backgrounds to the Foreground” is currently available only to SHRM members at: http://www.shrm.org/Publications/hrmagazine/EditorialContent/2010/1210/Pages/1210roberts.aspx.

Founded in 1996 in the San Francisco Bay area, Employment Screening Resources (ESR) is the company that wrote the book on background checks with ‘The Safe Hiring Manual’ by ESR founder and President Lester Rosen. Employment Screening Resources is accredited by The National Association of Professional Background Screeners (NAPBS®) Background Screening Credentialing Council (BSCC) for proving compliance with the Background Screening Agency Accreditation Program (BSAAP). For more information about Employment Screening Resources, visit http://www.ESRcheck.com or contact Jared Callahan, ESR Director of Client Relations and Business Development, at 415.898.0044 or jcallahan@ESRcheck.com.

Source:
http://www.shrm.org/Publications/hrmagazine/EditorialContent/2010/1210/Pages/1210roberts.aspx

SHRM Tells EEOC Credit Checks Are Legitimate Background Screening Tool at Recent Public Meeting

By Thomas Ahearn, ESR News Blog

According to a news story on the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) website – “SHRM: Credit Checks Are Legitimate Screening Tool” – a representative for SHRM told the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) during a public hearing on October 20, 2010 that the federal government should not eliminate an employer’s use of credit histories to help make decisions about job candidates.

The representative, in prepared comments, said that “SHRM believes there is a compelling public interest in enabling our nation’s employers – whether that employer is in the government or the private sector – to assess the skills, abilities, and work habits of potential hires.” In addition, the representative said credit history is one of many factors – including education, experience and certifications – that employers use “to narrow that applicant pool to those who are most qualified.”

The SHRM representative pointed out Human Resources (HR) typically conducts a background check on the job finalist or group of finalists before making a job offer, and that background check might include checking personal references, criminal history, and credit history depending on the employer and the position to be filled.
 
Citing the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) of 1970 and the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the representative said SHRM believes “employees already have significant federal protection for the misuse of background checks.”
 
Recent SHRM Research Department data on the use of employer background screening practices was also referenced at the meeting. Among the findings:

  • Just 13 percent of employers surveyed conducted credit checks on all job candidates while another 47 percent consider credit history for candidates of select jobs.
  • Employers generally conducted credit checks only for certain positions, including jobs of financial or fiduciary responsibilities (91 percent), senior executive positions (46 percent) and positions with access to confidential employee information (34 percent).
  • Among employers that used credit checks, 57 percent initiated them only after making a contingent job offer and 30 percent initiated them after the job interview.
  • Four out of 10 employers surveyed did not conduct credit checks.

The EEOC heard public comment from SHRM and others to determine the extent of the practice of using credit checks during the background screening of job candidates, the effectiveness of its intended purpose, and its potential impact on different populations.

More information about the EEOC public meeting can be found at: http://www.eeoc.gov/eeoc/meetings/10-20-10/index.cfm

Employment Screening Resources (ESR) literally wrote the book on background checks with ‘The Safe Hiring Manual’ by ESR founder and President Lester Rosen. ESR is recognized as Background Screening Credentialing Council (BSCC) Accredited by the National Association of Professional Background Screeners (NAPBS®) for proving compliance with the Background Screening Agency Accreditation Program (BSAAP). For more information about Employment Screening Resources, visit http://www.ESRcheck.com.

Source:
http://www.shrm.org/about/news/Pages/LegitimateScreeningTool.aspx?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+shrm%2Fnews%2Fhr+(SHRM+Online%3A+HR+News)

CA Governor Schwarzenegger Vetoes Bill Limiting Use of Credit Reports for Employment Background Checks

By Thomas Ahearn, ESR News Blog

To the relief of a number of California employers, California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger has vetoed a bill passed by the California Legislature– AB 482 – that would have limited the use of credit reports by employers during employment background checks.

Assembly Bill (AB) 482 would have prohibited employers from using credit checks for employment purposes, except in limited circumstances.  In his “veto message” to the members of the California state assembly, the Governor stated that he vetoed the bill because existing law already provided protections for employees from improper use of credit reports and that the bill would “significantly increase the exposure for potential litigation over the use of credit checks.”

The Governor’s veto message is available on a Legislative Update press release at http://gov.ca.gov/press-release/16065/:

To the Members of the California State Assembly:

I am returning Assembly Bill 482 without my signature.

This bill would prohibit an employer from using a consumer credit report for employment purposes with certain exceptions.

This bill is similar to legislation I have vetoed for the last two years on the basis that California’s employers and businesses have inherent needs to obtain information about applicants for employment and existing law already provides protections for employees from improper use of credit reports. As with the last two bills, this measure would also significantly increase the exposure for potential litigation over the use of credit checks.

For these reasons, I am unable to sign this bill.

Sincerely,

Arnold Schwarzenegger

The use of credit reports by employers during employment background checks has become a very controversial subject. Several states have limited the use of credit reports for employment purposes and a federal bill seeks to ban credit report checks for most employment screening.

The Employment Screening Resources (ESR) News Blog has posted several articles on the use of credit repots during employment background checks:

However, ESR has also written about how ‘Credit Reports of Job Applicants May Not Always Be So Important To Employers’ to address concerns of applicants who are concerned how their damaged credit would affect their job searches. Employment credit checks are not as common as most people think.

According to a recent survey from the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), while 60% of organizations performed some type of credit report checks on job candidates, only 13% conducted credit report checks on all job candidates and 47% of organizations performed credit report checks on selected job candidates, mostly for executive positions or positions with financial responsibility or access to confidential or proprietary information.

For more information on background checks and credit reports, visit Employment Screening Resources (ESR) at http://www.ESRcheck.com.

Sources:
http://gov.ca.gov/press-release/16065/
http://dl5.activatedirect.com/fs/distribution:letterFile/yvcee9xanplikz_files/z5mlul9x4a1k16?&_c=d%7Cyvcee9xanplikz%7Cz5msx9bcq0v1fm&_ce=1285692164.e3bbe42d582391f05909ff900f2c86a6
http://www.leginfo.ca.gov/pub/09-10/bill/asm/ab_0451-0500/ab_482_bill_20100923_history.html

New Illinois Law Prohibits Pre-Employment Credit Checks on Most Job Applicants

Most job applicants and employees in the state of Illinois with less-than-stellar credit histories will soon not have to worry about employers running credit checks on them, as the state has joined Hawaii, Oregon, and Washington in passing a law limiting the use of credit reports by employers for employment screening background checks.

According to a press release from the State of Illinois news page at Illinois.gov, Governor Pat Quinn signed a bill into law that prohibits Illinois employers from discriminating based on the credit history of job seekers or employees. The new law – which takes effect on January 1, 2011 – removes a significant barrier to employment for jobseekers whose credit history has been affected by the greatest economic recession since the 1930’s.

Illinois House Bill 4658 creates the “Employee Credit Privacy Act,” which prohibits employers from inquiring about or using an employee’s or prospective employee’s credit history as a basis for employment, recruitment, discharge, or compensation. Employers who violate the new law can be subject to civil liability for damages or injunctive relief.

The new law, according to a quote from Governor Quinn in the press release, “will stop employers from denying a job or promotion based on information that is not an indicator of a person’s character or ability to do a job well.”

However, while the “Employee Credit Privacy Act” forbids employers from inquiring about an applicant or employee’s credit history or obtaining a copy of their credit report, the law does not affect an employer’s ability to conduct a thorough background check that does not contain a credit history or credit report. In addition, under the new law, employers may access credit checks under limited circumstances, including positions that involve:

  • bonding or security per state or federal law;
  • unsupervised access to more than $2,500;
  • signatory power over businesses assets of more than $100;
  • management and control of the business;
  • access to personal, financial or confidential information, trade secrets, or state or national security information.

According to the press release, pre-employment credit screenings are on the rise throughout the nation, as recent surveys by the Society for Human Resources Management (SHRM) found that 60 percent of employers run a credit check on at least some applicants, an increase from the 42 percent in 2006 and 25 percent in 1998.

More specifically, the SHRM surveys found that 13 percent of organizations performed credit checks on all candidates while 47 percent performed credit checks on selected job candidates, mostly for positions with fiduciary and financial responsibility such as handling cash, banking, and accounting.

For more information on the use of pre-employment credit checks by employers, and to keep up to date on the latest changes in laws pertaining to background checks, visit Employment Screening Resources (ESR) at http://www.ESRcheck.com.

Sources:

http://www.illinois.gov/PressReleases/ShowPressRelease.cfm?SubjectID=1&RecNum=8737

http://e-lobbyist.com/gaits/text/21025

Credit Checks More Common During Employment Background Checks But Are They Always Necessary?

MSNBC Article Quotes Employment Screening Resources President Lester Rosen

By Thomas Ahearn, ESR News Blog Writer

According to a recent article on MSNBC — Job Candidates Undergoing Credit Scrutiny — applicants applying for jobs these days can expect prospective employers to verify resume information, contact references, possibly do a criminal background check, and even be asked by companies to allow credit checks to scrutinize their credit histories.

The article cites a recent survey by the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) in which 60 percent of the responding companies claimed they perform credit checks of some or all job candidates. Breaking down the survey results further, only 13 percent of organizations performed credit checks on all job candidates while 47 percent performed them on selected job candidates, usually for positions with fiduciary and financial responsibility such as handling cash, banking, and accounting.

MSNBC also reported that credit checks are required about half the time for senior executive positions and that the SHRM survey also showed that potential candidates with outstanding judgments, accounts in collection, or a bankruptcy in their file may be passed over for a job.

Lester Rosen, President of Employment Screening Resources (ESR), was quoted in the MSNBC article as saying employers are “looking at the debt level compared to the potential income from the job”  and added that “if someone is under water financially as shown by the credit report, the thought is perhaps there could be a motive to embezzle or steal.”

However, while Rosen says credit checks are one method employers may use to hire honest and trustworthy employees that also provide some legal cover if that employee turns out to be dishonest, ESR does not encourage routine credit checks on all candidates since credit checks often contain errors and can feel like an invasion of privacy to applicants.

Rosen’s advice in the article for employers is to limit credit checks to relevant positions such as those that involve money. In fact, with many states recently passing laws limiting the use of credit checks for employment purposes, employers need to be careful when, to whom, and how they perform credit checks on prospective job applicants.

For jobseekers, ESR also provides information — at no charge — to job applicants on background checks and credit check reports can help job applicants navigate the background check process and maximize their chance at employment. The information is available on ESR’s ‘Applicant Resources’ page at: http://www.esrcheck.com/Applicant-Resources.php.

Whether the use of credit checks for employment purposes is discriminatory to certain job applicants — which ESR named Trend Number One in its Third Annual Top Ten Trends in the Pre-Employment Background Screening Industry for 2010 — is a question that will be asked as long as employers run credit checks on applicants with money troubles.

For more information on background checks and credit checks, visit Employment Screening Resources (ESR) at http://www.ESRcheck.com.

Sources:

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/38561183/ns/business-consumer_news/

http://www.esrcheck.com/wordpress/2010/03/23/shrm-surveys-reveal-3-out-of-4-businesses-conduct-reference-background-checks-and-criminal-background-checks/

http://www.esrcheck.com/wordpress/2010/06/02/esr-provides-information-to-job-applicants-on-background-checks-and-credit-reports/

http://www.esrcheck.com/wordpress/2010/01/04/2010-trend-on-increased-focus-on-whether-credit-reports-and-criminal-records-are-discriminatory/

Employment Screening Expert Lester Rosen to Present Session on Background Checks at SHRM Annual Conference

By ESR News Staff

Employment Screening Expert Lester Rosen, President of Employment Screening Resources (ESR), a leading employment screening firm headquartered in the San Francisco area, will present a session on background checks at the SHRM Annual Conference and Exhibition on June 30, 2010, in San Diego, California.

The annual event — the world’s largest human resources conference — is sponsored by the world’s largest human resources association, the Society for Human Resources Management (SHRM), and features top HR and business experts sharing their perspectives, strategies, tools, and tips for growing a company’s talent.

The session to be presented by Rosen — Negligent Hiring and Background Checks: Best Practices and Legal Compliance — will help human resources professionals avoid employee problems by identifying potentially problematic applicants through legally complaint due diligence tools.  The session addresses new trends and legal challenges facing employers, and will also cover issues such as the use of social networking sites, international background checks, and concerns over the use of credit reports and criminal records.

“I am very pleased to have the opportunity to review cutting-edge applicant selection topics that can help employers select the best candidates,” commented Rosen. “Exercising due diligence and staying out of court is mission critical for businesses of all sizes, and this presentation is aimed at identifying for  employers and recruiters the latest trends, tools, and legal developments.”

Rosen, a nationally recognized expert on employment screening background checks, is a writer and speaker on the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA), pre-employment screening, and safe hiring issues. In addition, Rosen authored the first comprehensive book on employment screening — The Safe Hiring Manual: The Complete Guide to Keeping Criminals, Imposters, and Terrorists Out of Your Workplace — and also wrote The Safe Hiring Audit.

In addition, Rosen was the chairperson of the steering committee that founded the National Association of Professional Background Screeners (NAPBS), the professional trade organization for the employment screening industry, and served as its first co-chairman in 2004.

For more information about the SHRM Annual Conference and Exhibition, visit http://annual.shrm.org/. For more information about background checks and employment screening, visit Employment Screening Resources (ESR) at www.ESRcheck.com.

Sources:

http://sanfrancisco.dbusinessnews.com/shownews.php?newsid=212110&type_news=latest

http://annual.shrm.org/

Credit Reporting Agency Fights to Preserve Use of Credit Checks during Employment Background Checks

By Lester Rosen, President of ESR & Thomas Ahearn, ESR Staff Writer

With 15 million workers currently unemployed according to recent Department of Labor statistics, it has been argued that job applicants risk getting caught in a Catch-22 situation where they have bad credit because they cannot get jobs but cannot get jobs because they have bad credit.

As a result, states such as Oregon, Washington, and Hawaii have already limited the use of credit reports for employment screening by enacting bans on credit checks during background checks unless the information directly relates to occupational qualifications.

However, the Chicago Tribune reported that one of three major credit bureaus that collect financial information on Americans – Chicago-based credit reporting agency TransUnion  is fighting to preserve the use of credit checks during employment background checks.

TransUnion defends credit checks as a way for employers to protect themselves against theft and fraud, since employees with poor credit history may be more likely to engage in unethical or illegal behavior, especially in jobs where they are involved with finances, according to the Tribune article.

Along with the other two large credit bureaus Equifax and Experian, TransUnion helps employers, financial institutions, landlords, among others to use credit information to guide their decisions about hiring, extending credit, lending money, and housing.

Although a recent survey from the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) found that 60 percent of employers performed credit background checks on all job candidates or on selected job candidates, that statistic can be misleading since of the firms that use credit checks, it appears the use is generally selective. The survey revealed that 47 percent of the employment credit reports were used only on selected candidates for positions that presumably involved access to assets, cash, or sensitive information.  Only 13 percent of employers used credit background checks across the board on all job candidates.  In addition, 40 percent of employers surveyed did not conduct any credit background checks. It could be argued that the alarm over the use of credit reports has been exaggerated.

In addition, given the fact that often times past employers will not give a reference beyond dates of employment and job title, employers may well be in need of additional tools when hiring for sensitive positions. 

Critics find credit checks during employment background checks discriminatory and bills restricting the practice have been introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives and many states. Even some background check firms advise caution with credit checks.

Employment Screening Resources (ESR), a leading national online background check firm, recently released its third annual Top Ten Trends in the Pre-Employment Background Screening Industry for 2010, which identified new trends making a difference as well as old trends that have evolved as the screening industry matures.

The first of the Top Tentrends ESR tracked for 2010 is the increased focus on whether credit reports used during background checks are discriminatory. ESR advises employers to approach credit reports with caution during background checks and to articulate a clear rationale as to why a credit report is related to a particular job. Employers should also be aware of the potential for errors in credit reports since information could be incorrectly reported or the applicant may be the victim of identify theft which can lead to false data.

On the other hand, ESR warns that hiring an employee that handles money, makes financial decisions, or has access to private data without running a credit reports during background checks could result in allegations of negligent hiring if a theft occurs.

Lester S. Rosen, the CEO of Employment Screening Resources, was quoted in an article on MSNBC as saying that “if a new worker is to have access to large amounts of company cash or financial systems, it’s only prudent for a hiring manager to find out if the applicant has a pile of unpaid debts.

Rosen went on to say: “If an employer hires an embezzler and did not do a credit report in a sensitive position and the employer was then sued for negligent hiring, the argument would then be: How stupid were you for not running a credit report?”

Though many employers run credit checks on some applicants, relatively few are turned down for a job because of bad credit, according to ESR’s Rosen. “It takes something pretty horrendous in the credit report to reverse a decision that they are vested in,he says.

One more thing to keep in mind, according to Rosen, is that it is an urban myth that employers receive a “credit score,” the three-digit numerical expressions  such as FICO based on statistical analysis of a consumer’s credit files. Employment credit reports  which are different than credit reports used for lending  do not contain a credit score.

For more information on credit reports used during background checks, read a white paper prepared jointly by LexisNexis and Employment Screening Resources (ESR) , “The Use of Credit Reports in Employment Background Screening:  An Overview for Job Applicants“ at http://www.esrcheck.com/docs/credit_report_whitepaper.pdf.

Sources:

http://www.chicagotribune.com/business/ct-biz-0429-credit-checks-transunion–20100428,0,5056644.story

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/empsit.nr0.htm

http://www.esrcheck.com/wordpress/1429/shrm-surveys-reveal-3-out-of-4-businesses-conduct-reference-background-checks-and-criminal-background-checks

http://www.esrcheck.com/wordpress/1548/new-oregon-law-prohibits-use-of-credit-history-of-job-applicants-for-employment-screening

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/35512038/ns/business-eye_on_the_economy/

http://www.esrcheck.com/wordpress/1237/employment-screening-resources-releases-third-annual-trends-for-pre-employment-background-screening-in-2010 

 http://www.esrcheck.com/wordpress/1139/2010-trend-on-increased-focus-on-whether-credit-reports-and-criminal-records-are-discriminatory